Blue Stream Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing Report for:

Yellowstone River - Livingston - Montana

Hatch Chart - Best Access/Spots - Local Fish - About

Water Flow Chart

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Using Water Flow Charts & Weather Reports: Begin with our water flow charts to grasp stream velocity and volume – look for stable or rising trends to pinpoint ideal fishing times. Learn to interpret sudden spikes or drops, which can indicate potential challenges. Next, consult our weather reports to understand ambient conditions. Pairing the two, you can anticipate fish behavior, choose the right gear, and select the best fishing spots. Use these tools together for a holistic approach to your next fishing adventure.

In-Depth Weather

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Directions To Location

Hatch Chart

Month Hatch Time of Day Recommended Fly Sizes Popular Fly Patterns
January Midge Afternoon 18-24 Griffith’s Gnat
Winter Stoneflies Warmest part of the day 16-20 Black Stonefly
February Midge Afternoon 18-24 Zebra Midge
Winter Stoneflies Warmest part of the day 16-20 Black Stonefly Nymph
March Blue Winged Olive Afternoon 16-18 Parachute Adams
Midges Afternoon 18-24 Griffith’s Gnat
April Blue Winged Olive Afternoon 16-18 Parachute Adams
March Brown Mid-Morning to Early-Afternoon 12-14 March Brown Parachute
May Caddis Late Afternoon and Evening 14-16 Elk Hair Caddis
Sulphurs Afternoon 16-20 Sulphur Parachute
June Yellow Sally Stoneflies Warmest part of the day 14-16 Yellow Sally
Caddis Evening 14-16 Elk Hair Caddis
July Yellow Sallies Afternoon and Evening 14-16 Yellow Sally
Tricos Morning 18-24 Trico Spinner
August Tricos Morning 18-24 Trico Spinner
Terrestrials Noon 6-10 Hopper Pattern
September Blue Winged Olives Afternoon 16-18 Parachute Adams
Terrestrials Noon 6-10 Ant Pattern
October October Caddis Afternoon and Evening 6-8 October Caddis Pupa
Blue Winged Olive Afternoon 16-18 Parachute Adams
November Midges Afternoon 18-24 Griffith’s Gnat
Winter Stoneflies Warmest part of the day 16-20 Black Stonefly
December Midges Afternoon 18-24 Zebra Midge
Winter Stoneflies Warmest part of the day 16-20 Black Stonefly Nymph

While we strive to ensure the precision of our hatch charts, some reflect broader river region insights. Through ongoing partnerships with local guides and fly shops, we’re committed to refining our data. Should you notice any inconsistencies or have feedback, we welcome you to reach out. 

Best Fishing Spots

The Yellowstone River in Livingston is a paradise for fly-fishing enthusiasts, offering several excellent spots:

  • Pine Creek: Nestled in the Paradise Valley, this area provides incredible scenery and a plethora of trout.
  • Mallard’s Rest: A designated fishing access site that’s open year-round, offering excellent chances to land a big one.
  • Mayor’s Landing: Located near the heart of Livingston, it presents a prime spot for Rainbow and Brown Trout.
  • Carter’s Bridge: Offers a convenient access to some of the finest sections of the Yellowstone River.

Remember to respect the local wildlife, always carry necessary permits and follow local rules and regulations for a safe and successful fly-fishing experience.

Best Access Points

The Yellowstone River in Livingston offers multiple access points for an optimal fly fishing trip. Here are the top four access points you may find useful:
  • Livingston’s Mayor’s Landing: This is right in town and offers multiple areas to wade and fish.
  • Mallard’s Rest: About 13 miles south of Livingston. The location is serene and less crowded, providing a fantastic fly fishing experience.
  • Carter’s Bridge: This spot is 7 miles south of Livingston. It’s known for its summer Caddis and Stonefly hatches.
  • Pine Creek Bridge: Located about 17 miles south of Livingston, it’s another productive spot particularly for trout.
Please remember to always be aware of private property rights when accessing these points and ensure you have the appropriate fishing licenses.

Local Fish

  • Trout
    1. Rainbow Trout
    2. Brown Trout
    3. Brook Trout
    4. Cutthroat Trout
  • Mountain Whitefish
  • Arctic Grayling
  • Northern Pike
  • Yellowstone Cutthroat
  • Salmon
    1. Sockeye Salmon

About The River

The Yellowstone River, a major tributary of the Missouri River, has a rich history that’s inherently tied to the city of Livingston, Montana. This gorgeous river is close to 700 miles long, making it the longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States!

This area was originally frequented by native tribes, such as the Crow tribe, who dubbed it Elks’ River. The Lewis and Clark Expedition made the river known to Europeans. In the late 19th century, the Northern Pacific Railway saw Livingston’s potential and developed it as a gateway city for those journeying to Yellowstone National Park.

  • The Yellowstone River was crucial for the settlement and growth of Livingston, providing valuable resources for settlers.
  • Livingston was the original gateway to Yellowstone National Park thanks to its strategic location.
  • The Yellowstone River remains an iconic feature of Livingston’s landscape, attracting thousands of tourists yearly for fly fishing and rafting activities.

Indeed, the history and significance of the Yellowstone River continue to shape Livingston’s identity to this day.

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