Blue Stream Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing Report for:

Sandy River - Marmot - Oregon

Hatch Chart - Best Access/Spots - Local Fish - About

Water Flow Chart

Using Water Flow Charts & Weather Reports: Begin with our water flow charts to grasp stream velocity and volume – look for stable or rising trends to pinpoint ideal fishing times. Learn to interpret sudden spikes or drops, which can indicate potential challenges. Next, consult our weather reports to understand ambient conditions. Pairing the two, you can anticipate fish behavior, choose the right gear, and select the best fishing spots. Use these tools together for a holistic approach to your next fishing adventure.

In-Depth Weather

Directions To Location

Hatch Chart

Month Hatch Time of Day Recommended Fly Sizes Popular Fly Patterns
January Midges Morning/Evening 18-22 Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge
February Midges, Winter stoneflies Morning/Evening 16-20 for Midges, 8-12 for Stoneflies Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge, Black Stonefly Nymph
March Midges, Stoneflies, Blue Winged Olive All Day 16-20 for Midges, 8-12 for Stoneflies, 18-20 for Olive Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge, Black Stonefly Nymph, Blue Winged Olive
April Midges, Stoneflies, Blue Winged Olive, Caddis All day 16-20 for Midges, 8-12 for Stoneflies, 16-18 for Caddis Zebra Midge, Black Stonefly Nymph, Blue Winged Olive, Elk Hair Caddis
May Blue Winged Olive, Caddis, Mayflies All day 16-18 for Caddis, 14-16 for Mayflies Blue Winged Olive, Elk Hair Caddis, Parachute Adams
June Caddis, Mayflies, Stoneflies All day 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis, Parachute Adams, Golden Stonefly Nymph
July Caddis, Mayflies, Terrestrials All day 10-14 for Terrestrials, 14-18 for Others Elk Hair Caddis, Parachute Adams, Hopper patterns
August Terrestrials, Caddis All day 10-14 for Terrestrials, 14-16 for Caddis Hopper patterns, Elk Hair Caddis
September Terrestrials, Caddis, Blue Winged Olive All day 10-14 for Terrestrials, 14-18 for others Hopper patterns, Elk Hair Caddis, Blue Winged Olive
October Midges, Blue Winged Olive All day 18-22 for Midges, 16-18 for Olive Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge, Blue Winged Olive
November Midges, Blue Winged Olive, Winter stoneflies Morning/Evening 18-22 for Midges, 10-12 for Stoneflies Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge, Black Stonefly Nymph
December Midges, Winter stoneflies Morning/Evening 18-22 for Midges, 10-12 for Stoneflies Griffith's Gnat, Zebra Midge, Black Stonefly Nymph

While we strive to ensure the precision of our hatch charts, some reflect broader river region insights. Through ongoing partnerships with local guides and fly shops, we’re committed to refining our data. Should you notice any inconsistencies or have feedback, we welcome you to reach out. 

Best Fishing Spots

The Sandy River – Marmot, located in Oregon, US, is popular among fly fishing enthusiasts. Some of the top spots for casting a line on this beautiful river include:

  • Marmot Dam: Though no longer operational, the site attracts many species due to the strong water currents. Fish such as winter steelhead and spring Chinook Salmon congregate here.
  • Oxbow Regional Park: With slower currents, it’s made for beginners. It’s a fantastic place for catching Coho Salmon.
  • Cedar Creek: Located near Sandy Hatchery, it boasts an abundance of steelhead.
  • Revenue Bridge: This area offers robust access to the river, making it a preferred destination amongst anglers.
  • Dodge Park: Where the Sandy River meets Bull Run River, this spot is particularly known for its spring Chinook salmon.

Remember! Always check local fishing regulations before heading out.

Best Access Points

The Sandy River – Marmot offers some of the best access points for fly fishing. Below are some prominent locations:

  • Cedar Creek Fish Hatchery: Located further upstream from the main parking lot, this location is excellent for angling.
  • Oxbow Regional Park: The park provides various access points along the river, famed for its native fish species.
  • Dodge Park: It’s a public access point that offers deep pools and runs, perfect for fly fishing.
  • Lewis and Clark State Park: The junction of the Sandy River and Beaver Creek provides an excellent fishing spot.
  • Revenue Bridge: This public access spot is a favorite among anglers.

Each location offers its unique traits and experiences. Make sure to check with the local fishing reports for the best time for fly fishing in these areas.

Local Fish

  • Steelhead: One of the most popular fish for fly fishing in the Sandy River, the Steelhead are much loved for their high energy and fighting spirit.
  • Chinook Salmon: Also known as King Salmon, these fish are known for their size and strength, making them a favorite amongst fly fishers.
  • Coastal Cutthroat Trout: A native species of the Sandy River, the Coastal Cutthroat Trout can be a challenge to catch but are worth the effort.
  • Rainbow Trout: Considered one of the most beautiful fish, Rainbow Trout are well sought after for their vibrant color and tasty flesh.
  • Brown Trout: A non-native species that has been introduced to the River, Brown Trout are known for their large size and aggressive nature.
  • Brook Trout: Another non-native fish, the Brook Trout is a favorite amongst fly fishers due to their bright color and tasty flesh.
  • Mountain Whitefish: A native fish of the Sandy River, the Mountain Whitefish can be found in large numbers and are a mainstay for a fly fisher’s catch.
  • Chum Salmon: Chum Salmon are a popular fish amongst fly fishers due to their large size and the challenge they give when fighting on the line.

About The River

The Sandy River – Marmot is an enchanting destination with a rich history. Discovered in the early 19th century, it originates from the melting glaciers of Mount Hood, Oregon. It’s named after the “Quicksand River” due to its sandy riverbed.

  • The river is heralded for its diverse ecosystem, brimming with countless species of fish. It is a highly sought-after fishing destination.
  • The Sandy was once the home to the native Chinook and Multnomah tribes.
  • Its watershed played a significant role in the timber industry during the 20th century.

The Sandy River and Marmot Dam witnessed a historical moment in the summer of 2007. The dam was removed, marking one of the largest dam removal projects in the U.S.! This highlighted the importance of restoring natural water flow and fish migration paths. It’s a testament to preserving nature’s most breathtaking wonders.

The Sandy River – Marmot story continues to evolve, offering unforgettable experiences for both explorers and local communities.

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