Blue Stream Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing Report for:

Navarro River - Near Navarro - California

Hatch Chart - Best Access/Spots - Local Fish - About

Water Flow Chart

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Using Water Flow Charts & Weather Reports: Begin with our water flow charts to grasp stream velocity and volume – look for stable or rising trends to pinpoint ideal fishing times. Learn to interpret sudden spikes or drops, which can indicate potential challenges. Next, consult our weather reports to understand ambient conditions. Pairing the two, you can anticipate fish behavior, choose the right gear, and select the best fishing spots. Use these tools together for a holistic approach to your next fishing adventure.

In-Depth Weather

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Directions To Location

Hatch Chart

Month Hatch Time of Day Recommended Fly Sizes Popular Fly Patterns
January Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-26 Zebra Midges
Blue Wing Olives Some Cloudy and Cool Evenings 16-18 Rusty Spinner
February Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-26 Zebra Midges
Blue Wing Olives Some Cloudy and Cool Evenings 16-18 Rusty Spinner
March Blue Wing Olives Afternoon 16-18 Rusty Spinner
April Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
Blue Wing Olives Cloudy Days 16-18 Rusty Spinner
May Stoneflies All Day 6-10 Golden Stonefly
Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
June Stoneflies All Day 6-10 Golden Stonefly
Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
July Hoppers Mid-morning/Mid-afternoon 6-10 Dave's Hopper
Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
August Hoppers Mid-morning/Mid-afternoon 6-10 Dave's Hopper
Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
September Caddis Afternoon/Evening 14-18 Elk Hair Caddis
October Blue Winged Olives Afternoon 16-20 Rusty Spinner
November Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-26 Zebra Midges
Blue Wing Olives Some Cloudy and Cool Evenings 16-18 Rusty Spinner
December Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-26 Zebra Midges
Blue Wing Olives Some Cloudy and Cool Evenings 16-18 Rusty Spinner

While we strive to ensure the precision of our hatch charts, some reflect broader river region insights. Through ongoing partnerships with local guides and fly shops, we’re committed to refining our data. Should you notice any inconsistencies or have feedback, we welcome you to reach out. 

Best Fishing Spots

Most fly fishers consider the Navarro River in California as a favored location. Here are some of the best spots to fly fish:
  • Anderson Valley: An excellent place primarily for catching rainbow trout, and it is more secluded than other areas of the river.
  • Mouth of the Navarro River: Situated in Navarro River Redwoods State Park, this spot is productive for steelhead during the winter season.
  • Rancheria Creek: A tributary of the Navarro river with ample opportunities for fly fishing.
It’s important to note, during summer, the river’s flow can decrease, making fishing more challenging. Spring and late fall are generally the best times for fly fishing on the Navarro River. Lastly, make sure to follow all local regulations and practice catch and release to ensure the sustainability of this amazing fishing spot.

Best Access Points

The Navarro River, near Navarro, offers some great access points for fly fishing. These points are vital for enjoying a successful fly fishing trip.
  • Navarro River Redwoods State Park: This is an area where the river flows through a redwood forest, providing an unmatched ambiance for fishing. The river is easily accessible from the park’s camping and picnic areas.
  • Paul M. Dimmick Campground: Located within the redwood forest, this campground offers riverfront sites where you can practically fish from your tent. This is a favorite spot for anglers due to the river’s abundance of steelhead.
  • Highway 128: Several spots along this highway offer access to the Navarro River. Look out for public access signs. The spots near the mouth of the river are especially productive for fly fishing.
  • Rancheria Creek confluence: An excellent spot for fly fishing, where Rancheria Creek meets Navarro River. The access here is challenging but rewarding.

Local Fish

  • Steelhead Trout: The Navarro River is famous for its strong population of Steelhead. The fly fishers primarily target these species during the winter migration.
  • Chinook Salmon: Also known as King Salmon, these fish are targeted during the spawning season in late summer to early fall. These are hard-fighting fish that require sturdy equipment.
  • Coho Salmon: These fish are present in the Navarro River, but their populations are less abundant compared to the Chinook Salmon. They arrive for spawning in the late fall and early winter.
  • Cutthroat Trout: These trout are native to the river and can be found throughout the year. Secluded sections of the river offer the best chance for fly fishers targeting Cutthroats.
  • Rainbow Trout: Resident populations of Rainbow Trout can be found in the river and fly fishers can target them throughout the year. They are known for their acrobatic fight when hooked.
  • Brown Trout: Although not native to the river, Brown Trout are frequently targeted by fly fishers. These opportunistic feeders are known to take a wide range of flies.
  • Shad: The American Shad is a commonly targeted species for fly fishers on the Navarro River. They are caught during their spring spawning run.
  • Striped Bass: Striped bass is another fish targeted by fly fishers. These fish are aggressive feeders and provide a thrilling fishing experience.

About The River

The Navarro River is a charming and historically rich waterway. Nestled near Navarro, California, this river provides a breathtaking spectacle as it streaks between lush forests and vibrant vineyards. The Navarro River’s history begins over thousands of years ago, with its rich ecosystem being a valuable resource for Pomo and Miwok Native American tribes.

During the 19th century, the river became the backbone of timber and wine industries. It was heavily used to transport redwood logs to the coast, turning the once quiet area into a bustling logging mill town. Today, we see a different face of the Navarro River. Conservation efforts are prioritizing preserving the river’s health and biodiversity.

  • Navarro’s early inhabitants: Pomo and Miwok tribes
  • 19th-century boom: Timber and wine industries
  • Modern focus: Conservation and biodiversity

Despite the significant transformations, the river’s allure remains—a testament to the rich tapestry of history and nature’s endurance.

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