Blue Stream Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing Report for:

Little Pigeon River - Sevierville - Tennessee

Hatch Chart - Best Access/Spots - Local Fish - About

Water Flow Chart

Using Water Flow Charts & Weather Reports: Begin with our water flow charts to grasp stream velocity and volume – look for stable or rising trends to pinpoint ideal fishing times. Learn to interpret sudden spikes or drops, which can indicate potential challenges. Next, consult our weather reports to understand ambient conditions. Pairing the two, you can anticipate fish behavior, choose the right gear, and select the best fishing spots. Use these tools together for a holistic approach to your next fishing adventure.

In-Depth Weather

Directions To Location

Hatch Chart

Month Hatch Time of Day Recommended Fly Sizes Popular Fly Patterns
January Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-22 Black Beauty, Zebra Midge
February Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-22 Black Beauty, Zebra Midge
Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
March Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-22 Black Beauty, Zebra Midge
Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
Little Black Caddis Afternoon 16-20 Black Elk Wing Caddis
April Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-22 Black Beauty, Zebra Midge
Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
Little Black Caddis Afternoon 16-20 Black Elk Wing Caddis
Hendricksons Afternoon/Evening 12-14 Hendrickson Dry, Red Quill
May Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
Little Black Caddis Afternoon 16-20 Black Elk Wing Caddis
Hendricksons Afternoon/Evening 12-14 Hendrickson Dry, Red Quill
Sulphurs Afternoon 14-18 Sulphur Dun, Thorax Sulphur
Green Drakes Mid Day/Afternoon 8-12 Green Drake Cripple, Royal Wulff
June Sulphurs Afternoon 14-18 Sulphur Dun, Thorax Sulphur
Green Drakes Mid Day/Afternoon 8-12 Green Drake Cripple, Royal Wulff
Light Cahills Evening 14-16 Light Cahill, Sulphur Dun
Isonychia (Slate Drakes) Evening 12-14 Isonychia Dry Fly, Slate Drake Cripple
July Light Cahills Evening 14-16 Light Cahill, Sulphur Dun
Isonychia (Slate Drakes) Evening 12-14 Isonychia Dry Fly, Slate Drake Cripple
August Terrestrials Mid Day 10-14 Ant Patterns, Beetle Patterns
Isonychia (Slate Drakes) Evening 12-14 Isonychia Dry Fly, Slate Drake Cripple
September Terrestrials Mid Day 10-14 Ant Patterns, Beetle Patterns
Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
October Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
Isonychia (Slate Drakes) Evening 12-14 Isonychia Dry Fly, Slate Drake Cripple
November Blue Winged Olives Noon/Mid Afternoon 18 Sparkle Dun, Blue Quill
December Midges Morning/Afternoon 18-22 Black Beauty, Zebra Midge

While we strive to ensure the precision of our hatch charts, some reflect broader river region insights. Through ongoing partnerships with local guides and fly shops, we’re committed to refining our data. Should you notice any inconsistencies or have feedback, we welcome you to reach out. 

Best Fishing Spots

Little Pigeon River in Sevierville is a hotspot for fly fishing enthusiasts offering rich aquatic life and beautiful landscapes. Here are some of the best spots along the river for an exciting fly fishing experience.

  • Greenbrier: Easily accessible off Route 321, Greenbrier offers a diverse selection of fish including rainbow, brown and brook trout. The area upstream and downstream of the Ranger Station is particularly popular.
  • Emerts Cove: A less crowded spot, with a mix of wild and stocked trout, ideal for fly anglers looking for a peaceful fishing experience.
  • Pigeon Forge City Park: An easily accessible spot, particularly popular with beginners due to its stocked fish population.
  • Metcalf Bottoms: Located further down the river, Metcalf Bottoms is renowned for its large fish population and scenic beauty, making it a favorite spot amongst experienced anglers.

Best Access Points

The Little Pigeon River in Sevierville offers some excellent opportunities for fly fishing. However, to maximize your chances of success, you need to know the best access points. You can find them at:

  • Gatlinburg Trail: A stretch of the river that runs along this trail, which offers multiple spots to cast a line.
  • Greenbrier Area: Accessed via the six-mile Greenbrier Road, here the river features deep pools and fast-moving runs.
  • Elkmont Campground: One of the best places on the river for rainbow and brook trout.
  • Meigs Falls: Accessible via a short trail, it’s perfect for those looking for a secluded fishing spot.
  • Metcaff Bottoms Picnic Area: Ideal for families, as it combines an excellent fishing spot with picnic facilities.

Local Fish

  • Brown Trout: The Little Pigeon River is known for its large population of Brown Trout, making it a popular destination for fly fishers.
  • Brook Trout: This native species is another favorite amongst fly fishers. The clear, cold waters of the river provide an ideal habitat for them.
  • Rainbow Trout: The vibrant colors of the Rainbow Trout make it a prized catch. They are stocked yearly in the river and thrive in its water conditions.
  • Smallmouth Bass: These aggressive fighters are a favorite target of many anglers and are abundant in the Little Pigeon River.
  • Largemouth Bass: Although not as common as the Smallmouth, Largemouth Bass can also be found in the river, providing an exciting challenge.
  • Rock Bass: Also known as ‘red eye’, these fish are found in large numbers and provide lots of action for fly fishers.
  • Walleye: Walleye grow to a good size in the river and are admired for their strength and determination when hooked.
  • Bluegill: These sunfish are small but feisty and a lot of fun to catch on light tackle or a fly rod.

About The River

The Little Pigeon River coursing through beautiful Sevierville, an important stream right in Tennessee, holds a fascinating history. This delightful waterway gets its name from the mass of passenger pigeons seen on the river’s sandbars by early settlers.

Its vibrant history includes:

  • In the late 1700s, the river banks saw the construction of the first European settlements in the area called Forks of the River.
  • During the Cherokee–American wars, the river was a crucial navigation route.
  • Prehistoric artifacts dating back thousands of years have been discovered along its shores, attesting to early human habitation.

Today, the river provides a hub for fun outdoor immersive activities such as white-water rafting, fishing, and wildlife spotting. Viewing the Little Pigeon River is like opening a picturesque window to the past, while also embracing the natural wonders of the present.

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