Blue Stream Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing Report for:

Black River - North Springfield - Vermont

Hatch Chart - Best Access/Spots - Local Fish - About

Water Flow Chart

Using Water Flow Charts & Weather Reports: Begin with our water flow charts to grasp stream velocity and volume – look for stable or rising trends to pinpoint ideal fishing times. Learn to interpret sudden spikes or drops, which can indicate potential challenges. Next, consult our weather reports to understand ambient conditions. Pairing the two, you can anticipate fish behavior, choose the right gear, and select the best fishing spots. Use these tools together for a holistic approach to your next fishing adventure.

In-Depth Weather

Directions To Location

Hatch Chart

Month Hatch Time of Day Recommended Fly Sizes Popular Fly Patterns
January Midges All Day 22-24 Zebra Midge
February Midges, Early Black Stonefly All Day 22-24, 16-18 Zebra Midge, Kauffman Stone
March Early Black Stonefly Afternoon 14-18 Double Tungsten Stone
Little Brown Stonefly Afternoon 12-14 Bitch Creek Nymph
April Little Brown Stonefly Afternoon 12-14 Bitch Creek Nymph
Hendricksons Afternoon 12-14 Parachute Adams
Blue Winged Olives Overcast/Rainy days 18-22 Rusty Spinner
May Blue Winged Olives Overcast/Rainy days 18-22 Hare's Ear Nymph
Caddis Afternoon 14-18 CDC Caddis Emerger
June Green Drakes, Tricos Evening, Morning 8-12, 20-24 Royal Wulff, Trico Spinner
July Tricos Early Morning 20-24 Rusty Spinner
August Midges, Tricos Morning, Evening 24-26, 20-24 Zebra Midge, Trico Spinner
September Blue Wing Olive Afternoon, Evening 16-20 Quill Gordon
Isonychia, Caddis Evening 12-14, 14-18 Pheasant Tail Nymph, Elk Hair Caddis
October Blue Wing Olive Afternoon, Evening 16-20 Quill Gordon
Isonychia, Caddis Evening 12-14, 14-18 Pheasant Tail Nymph, Elk Hair Caddis
November Blue Wing Olive Afternoon, Evening 16-20 Quill Gordon
December Midges All Day 22-26 Zebra Midge

While we strive to ensure the precision of our hatch charts, some reflect broader river region insights. Through ongoing partnerships with local guides and fly shops, we’re committed to refining our data. Should you notice any inconsistencies or have feedback, we welcome you to reach out. 

Best Fishing Spots

North Springfield’s Black River offers some of the most exciting fly fishing spots in Vermont:

  • Falls Area: Known for its rushing waters and hilly terrain, this area offers great opportunities for catching large rainbow and brown trout.
  • Comtu Falls: A perfect spot for fly fishing due to the confluence of the Black River and the Ottauquechee River. As a natural gathering spot for fish, anglers can find brook, rainbow, and brown trout.
  • Springfield Reservoir: Provides a tranquil setting and a large population of bass, in addition to trout species.
  • Downstream of the North Springfield Dam: This spot hosts a big population of trophy-sized fish owing to the deep pools.

Remember to follow the fishing regulations, maintain cleanliness, and respect the space of other anglers for a pleasant fly fishing experience.

Best Access Points

The Black River in North Springfield is a popular destination for avid fly fishers. Here are some of the best access points:
  • Springfield Dam area: Good spot to seek trout. Park at the Black River Trailhead and walk downstream.
  • North Springfield Lake: Abundant with trout, bass, and pike. Accessible from the public boat launch.
  • Near Route 106: River access near Downers Corners. Look for rainbow and brook trout especially in cooler months.
  • Comtu Falls: Parking lot located on Union Street in Springfield. The falls are popular for rainbow trout.
Remember to always respect private property. In many areas, fishing is allowed but the land around the river is privately owned. Always check local and state regulations regarding fishing seasons, legal bait, and bag limits.

Local Fish

  1. Brook Trout
  2. Rainbow Trout
  3. Brown Trout
  4. Atlantic Salmon
  5. Grayling
  6. Pike
  7. Whitefish
  8. Walleye

About The River

Just imagine the excitement in 1794 when pioneers discovered the natural beauty of the Black River in what’s now North Springfield. Originating from the heart of Vermont, the Black River has been the lifeblood of many communities along its 40-mile journey. This treasure has also spawned a rich history of industrial growth.

The 19th century saw numerous mills built along its banks, harnessing the river’s power for manufacturing textiles, furniture, and machine parts. The river also served commercial and recreational purposes. It was synonymous with fishing, boating, and picturesque camping sites.

  • 1829 was a landmark year – the arrival of the railway network bolstered North Springfield’s economic growth.
  • By 1859, North Springfield was home to the largest woolen mill in the state.
  • Fast forward to the 1900s, the river helped power electric plants.

In the modern era, the Black River continues to thrive, with its rich history adding charm to the breathtaking scenery and inviting recreational activities.

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